MOTIVATION FROM OUR ANCESTORS: “DO IT NOW!”


My wife and I stole away for a night at the historic, 1875 St. James Hotel in Red Wing, MN.  A river town, Red Wing is filled with history all culminating and displayed on the walls of this regal sleepery.  One picture that graced a prominent wall fascinated me.  In fact, the wait staff thought I’d lost my mind as I stared at it for a long periods of time.

It was a 1920‘s picture of the manager at the time, Charles Lillybald, sitting at his desk behind the registration counter of the lobby.  It is a very busy picture.  Papers hanging from the drawers, a guest checking in and his assistant standing, ready to serve.

But what captured me was learning about Mr. Lillybald and how he – within a few short years of starting work at the St. James – ended up buying out the partners and owning the hotel himself.  No computers.  No internet.  No brokers or transactional consultants.  How did he accomplish so much in so little time?  Staring at the photo, I think I found the answer.

Next to the calendar that perched on top of the desk was a motivational slogan simply stating “Do it now.”  Three simple words that most likely were at the heart of Charles ambition.

So how do you “Do it Now?”

Michael Hyatt’s guest blogger wrote a great blog with 5 tips on how to “Do it Now” and stop procrastinating:

  1. Tackle the most difficult task first.   
  2. Divide the task into smaller tasks.  
  3. Set a mid-day alarm.  
  4. Dedicate yourself for a small period of time.  
  5. Schedule your tasks on the calendar.  

If you’d like to have these fleshed out, CLICK HERE to read the explanations.

How do you avoid procrastination and motivate yourself to “Do it Now?”

Peace!

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3 thoughts on “MOTIVATION FROM OUR ANCESTORS: “DO IT NOW!”

  1. Loren Pinilis says:

    It may sound goofy, but simply just telling myself “Do It Now!” works well. It’s verbally calling myself out on my procrastination. It’s bringing that lazy tendency right into full view, and something about that challenges me. Recognizing the procrastination is 90% of the work.

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